Treatment of Gum Diseases linked to Improvement in General Health

All of us have heard that Oral Health is linked to General Health and if you maintain good oral hygiene and periodontal health your overall general health will also improve drastically. All this while these were speculations but now a study has been conducted by Dr. Marjorie Jeffcoat.

Dr. Marjorie Jeffcoat of University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine in Philadelphia lead this study where she related Periodontal disease which is a chronic inflammatory condition affecting the structures surrounding the roots of teeth. In this type of infection there are lot of bacteria and micro organisms which are present in the infection site and will lead to bone loss in the area of infection.

Relation of gingival disease with general health

The Study was conducted with the help of Pennsylvania insurance companies where the details of the treatment types and costs of patients could be made available. The team had compared the relationship between Periodontal disease and dental health by comparing the patients who had undergone regular periodontal treatments and had healthy Gums and teeth compared to patients who did not undergo any periodontal treatments.

All types of patients were included in the study Heart patients, pregnant women, patients suffering from diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and stroke patients. Approximately 338,891 patients were included in the study and the results of the study are as follows.

Women who were pregnant and treated for gum disease had medical costs that were 74 percent lower than those with untreated gum disease, according to findings published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

On average, non-dental healthcare costs for people with diabetes or stroke were about 40 percent lower if their gum disease was treated. For those with coronary artery disease, costs were about 11 percent lower with treatment.

When gum disease was treated, hospital admissions were also 39 percent lower among people with diabetes, 21 percent lower for stroke patients and 29 percent lower for those with coronary artery disease.

Ryan Demmer who studied periodontal disease said that this can be possible because of the presence of millions of microbes present in mouth which can be multiplied in case of infection and can hinder in recovering from systemic diseases when ingested through food saliva or water.

Jeffcoat published this study in American Journal of Preventive Medicine and said that this was published in Preventive medicine and not in dental journal because physicians should see the findings and suggest regular periodontal checkups and advice for patients to maintain good oral hygiene.

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