Oral medicine and radiology Archive

Bruxism – Causes, Symptoms and Treatment (Night or Day Grinding)

What is Bruxism? Definition: According to AAOFP bruxism is a diurnal or nocturnal parafunctional activity including clenching, bracing, gnashing and grinding of the teeth. Ramfjord 1996: As a habitual grinding of teeth where individual is not chewing or swallowing. Rubina 1986: Indicates a nonfunctional contact of teeth which may include clenching, gnashing, grinding and tapping [&hellip

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Classification of Desensitizing Agents used in management of Dentin Hypersensitivity

Dentinal Hypersensitivity is one of the most common condition for which a patient visits a Dental clinic for, the most common cause of Hypersensitivity is exposed dentinal surfaces which can be due to many reasons. Although Hypersensitivity is seen more in elder patients due to their age related loss of Enamel surface, it can affect [&hellip

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Radiographic features of disease of Maxillary Sinus

The Maxillary Sinus is largest of all the Sinuses and is located in the maxilla. The air filled cavity is lined by pseudo stratified columnar epithelium. The Maxillary sinus is pyramidal in shape, Boundaries of Maxillary sinus are the Medial wall is formed by the lateral wall of nasal cavity, the roof is formed by [&hellip

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Faulty Radiographs due to Faulty Processing Techniques

Faults in Radiographs can render them useless for their main purpose of helping in Diagnosis, these are called as non diagnostic radiographs as they do not provide any information or detail to get a diagnosis. A Radiograph to be useful for Diagnostic purpose should have proper dimensions replicating the size of the object being X-rayed, [&hellip

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Dosimetry in Radiology – Devices used to measure Radiation Exposure

Dosimetry: It is the determination or measurement of the amount of Radiation Exposure or dose in Diagnostic radiology for Medical or Dental purpose. With the increase in the number of Diagnostic tests which are quite helpful in Diagnosis are found to be equally harmful. There are studies linking excess exposure to X-ray Radiation and cancers [&hellip

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Panoramic Radiography – Uses, Disadvantages and Structures visible in OPG

Panoramic Radiography is the technique used to record or examine both the Maxillary and Mandibular arches along with certain surrounding structures in a single radio graph. As the term Panorama means any wide-angle view or representation, a Panoramic Radiograph helps in getting a wide angle view of both the arches. It is termed as Rotational [&hellip

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What is Retromolar Trigone – Anatomy, Boundaries and Importance

Retromolar Trigone (rTR) is the Gingiva or mucosa covering the alveolar ridge posterior to the last Mandibular molar overlying the ramus of the mandible and is defined as a Roughly triangular space

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Types of Dental Pain – Pulpal, Odontogenic, Periodontal, Myofacial and Cardiac Toothache

Pain is defined as “A more or less localized sensation of discomfort, distress or agony resulting from the stimulation of nerve endings” by Dorland’s medical dictionary. According to the Association for the study of Pain (IASP), Pain is defined as “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described [&hellip

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TMJ Ankylosis – Types, Classification, Aetiology, Diagnosis, Clinical Features and Treatment

Ankylosis in general means immobility of a joint due to any reason, TMJ ankylosis is immobility of the Mandible due to reasons such as trauma, infection, disease, failed surgery, Rheumatoid arthritis and most common being congenital. Temporomandibular Joint is a complex structure that helps in the movement of the mandible with the help of Ligaments [&hellip

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Local Anesthesia Toxicity – Signs & Symptoms and Management

Local Anesthesia is the most commonly used medication in dentistry to provide anesthesia or pain control for most dental procedures involving teeth, gums and supporting soft tissue. But like any medication there are chances of toxicity to local anesthetic if the correct dosage is not administered. It is always recommended to calculate the Dosage of [&hellip

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Enlargement of Lymph Nodes and their related Dental Conditions

Lymphatic System comprises of Lymph nodes in the Facial region which are related to the Oral cavity and are enlarged due to infection of the particular region. Palpation of Lymph nodes helps in Provisional Diagnosis of oral conditions. The Lymph nodes should be checked for tenderness, mobility, enlargement and consistency while performing a Examination. Facial [&hellip

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How to differentiate between Acute Alveolar Abscess and Periodontal Abscess

Acute apical abscess is also known as Acute alveolar abscess which is the localized collection of pus in the alveolar bone at the root apex of the affected tooth. It is caused when the infection extends through the apical foramen into the peri-radicular tissue. Periodontal Abscess is caused due to impaction of foreign body in [&hellip

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Local Anesthesia Allergy and how to perform Skin Test in Dental Clinic

Allergic Reactions to Local Anesthesia is quite rare but when it does happen, it can turn complicated very fast and requires immediate response from the Dentist and Dental Staff to make sure that the vitals of the patient are kept Stable. Local Anesthesia is categorized into 2 types – Amides (Lidocaine, bupivacaine, prilocaine, articaine etc) [&hellip

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Antifungal and Antiviral Drugs for Oral or Dental Lesions

Most common Fungal infection of the Oral cavity is Candidiasis, other non-candidial fungal infections seen in the Oral cavity are mycoses, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, paracoccidioidomycosis, oral geotrichosis, zygomycosis or mucormycosis, fusariosis and Phodotorula infection. Patients with impaired immune competence (HIV, tumors, leuemia, transplants etc) are most prone to Fungal infections. Viral infections of the [&hellip

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